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odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims

1Criminalizing Blackness in America

2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares

3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death

4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)

This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe

Sheena Is A Punk Rocker by The Ramones

horrorpandas:

debbieb3:

muah!

If my boyfriend and I were cats

theunderestimator:

Paul Simonon & Mick Jones of The Clash, Glen Matlock of The Sex Pistols & members of Steel Pulse demonstrating outside National Front Leader Martin Webster’s house in 1977 (photographed by Caroline Coon).
"Wedlock In Dreadlock": The punk & reggae connection weekly tribute (pt 6)

"…Black and white unite in staging an anti-racism demonstration outside the headquarters of the National Front in early 1977. The protest, a year before the Rock Against Racism concert in Victoria Park, united white punk with black roots reggae.  The two genres of music were booming in the UK at this time. A combination of huge cuts in welfare by a Labour Government under pressure, wage freezes and mass unemployment, along with the uninspiring glam rock and disco that dominated the radio during the mid 1970s, proved to be the perfect breeding ground for the political and religious messages of punk and roots reggae…”
(via)

(More stuff on "Wedlock In Dreadlock": The punk & reggae connection weekly tribute, here)

theunderestimator:

Paul Simonon & Mick Jones of The Clash, Glen Matlock of The Sex Pistols & members of Steel Pulse demonstrating outside National Front Leader Martin Webster’s house in 1977 (photographed by Caroline Coon).

"Wedlock In Dreadlock": The punk & reggae connection weekly tribute (pt 6)

"…Black and white unite in staging an anti-racism demonstration outside the headquarters of the National Front in early 1977. The protest, a year before the Rock Against Racism concert in Victoria Park, united white punk with black roots reggae.

The two genres of music were booming in the UK at this time. A combination of huge cuts in welfare by a Labour Government under pressure, wage freezes and mass unemployment, along with the uninspiring glam rock and disco that dominated the radio during the mid 1970s, proved to be the perfect breeding ground for the political and religious messages of punk and roots reggae…”

(via)

(More stuff on "Wedlock In Dreadlock": The punk & reggae connection weekly tribute, here)

cyberthug13:

punks gf: want me to jack u off babe

punk: no i will do it myself

punks gf: why

punk: DIY forever

oh-flern:

Jean-Ralphio Singing At People